News & Media

ALLTECK LINE CONTRACTORS EMERGENCY EFFORTS, 2015 WILD FIRES – ROCK CREEK, BRITISH COLUMBIA

Posted on: October 21, 2015

An abnormally dry, hot summer of 2015 in Western Canada resulted in devastating wild fires in B.C.’s vast, dense forests. The sheer size of the charred areas in B.C. alone is stunning. By August 17th the Province was at 3,004,848 hectares, which is a larger area than the island of Sicily, Italy and by September 02, it reached a size of over 3,953,043 ha; almost the size of Switzerland
(Resources Canada http://cwfis.cfs.nrcan.gc.ca/report and Global News).

In many communities in B.C.’s Southern Interior, hundreds of residents and vacationers were forced to flee aggressive blazes on foot, without any time to collect personal belongings. On Sunday, August 16, B.C.’s Premiere Christie Clark told evacuees in an overcrowded community center in Midway that early estimates predict the 2015 fire season could cost the Province another $400 million in addition to the $140 million already spent by mid-July.

In Rock Creek B.C., approximately 5 hours east of Vancouver, a blaze estimated at over 37 km2 in size, knocked out power to more than 1,200 residents. Allteck crews were called to the devastated area by Fortis BC, the local utility company, and our Emergency Response team was eager to lend a helping hand. Our role in the ongoing remedial efforts consisted of replacing burnt wooden structures and getting electric wires off the ground and back up where they belong, so that power could be restored.

When disaster strikes, restoring power is an essential first step in helping communities to regain a sense of normalcy. Allteck’s Emergency Restoration team is trained and prepared for a fast, effective and safe response in any emergency, anywhere in North America.

The following two (2) photos show Allteck crews “freeing up” conductors from burnt and toppled poles and removing compromised structures.

Following five (5) photos are damage assessment and repair photos.

Firefighters assess winds to determine safest approach.

Helicopters drop water and fire retardant on the blaze to help the firefighters below.

Vacationers in the Kettle River Provincial Park did all they could just to get themselves out. Thankfully everyone made it out in time for a shuttled bus to evacuate them to the Midway Community Centre. With no time to collect belongings, some escaped wearing nothing more than a swimsuit, or the clothes on their backs. Vehicles, campers and trailers had to be left behind as the aggressive fire was moving too quickly.